Volume 4, Issue 1, March 2019, Page: 9-18
Professional Integrity Among Pre-Service Teachers During Teaching Practice: Experience from School Leaders in Misungwi District, Tanzania
Placidius Ndibalema, Department of Educational Foundations and Continuing Education, the University of Dodoma, Dodoma City, Tanzania
Received: Dec. 29, 2018;       Accepted: Jan. 16, 2019;       Published: Jan. 30, 2019
DOI: 10.11648/j.tecs.20190401.12      View  97      Downloads  31
Abstract
This study investigated lived experiences among school leaders about pre-service teachers’ professional integrity during the teaching practice in Misungwi District. Narrative interview was used to collect the data. Fifteen (15) school leaders were purposively selected from 5 secondary schools that accommodated pre-service teachers to do the teaching practice in 2018. The narrative qualitative data analysis was employed in data analysis. The results indicated that school leaders experienced a number of professional misconducts which include the prevalence of sexual violence, disobedience to the dressing code, absenteeism and professional incompetence. The prevalence of these misconducts among pre-service teachers were attributed to a number of factors which include lack of awareness, inappropriate conduct among school-based teachers who are expected to be role models, ineffective working environment, lack of commitment and lack of volunteerism spirit. The study outlines possible strategies to enhance pre-service teachers’ professional integrity, such as upgrading the school curriculum to reflect sexual education, instilling the culture of collegiality and volunteerism. Furthermore, the study recommends for a shared national dialogue on effective strategies to enhance teachers’ professional integrity.
Keywords
Professional Integrity, Misconduct, Ethical Abuse, Values, School Leaders, Moral Obligation, Ethical Commitment, Pre-Service Teacher
To cite this article
Placidius Ndibalema, Professional Integrity Among Pre-Service Teachers During Teaching Practice: Experience from School Leaders in Misungwi District, Tanzania, Teacher Education and Curriculum Studies. Vol. 4, No. 1, 2019, pp. 9-18. doi: 10.11648/j.tecs.20190401.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Reference
[1]
Shukor, A. A. B. A., & Abdullah, E. B. M. H. (2016). Identifying Teachers’ Perception of Integrity in School-Based Assessment Practice: A Case Study. World Academy of Science, Engineering and Technology, International Journal of Social, Behavioral, Educational, Economic, Business and Industrial Engineering, 10 (3), 862-869.
[2]
Ukwueze, A., C. (2014). Teachers’ involvement in examination malpractices: Implications for counselling and quality secondary Education. Journal of Teacher Perspective, 8 (3), 1-11.
[3]
Magwa, S. (2015). Child sexual abuse by teachers in secondary schools in the Masvingo District, Zimbabwe: perceptions of selected stakeholders (Doctoral dissertation).
[4]
Altinyelken, H. K., & Le Mat, M. (2018). Sexual violence, schooling and silence: teacher narratives from a secondary school in Ethiopia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education, 48 (4), 648-664.
[5]
Mfaume, H., & Bilinga, M. (2017). Prevalence of Teachers’ Professional Malpractices in Tanzanian Public Secondary Schools: What Ought to Be Done?. Journal of Education and Training Studies, 5 (2), 43-52.
[6]
Kinyaduka, B. D., & Kiwara, J. F. (2014). Female student-Male Teacher Sexual Relationship in Moshi Municipality, Kilimanjaro, Tanzania: Sexual advance points, reasons, reporting status and responsible teacher category. Merit Research Journal of Education and Review, 2 (5), 085-091.
[7]
United Republic of Tanzania. (2018). The Tanzania teachers’ professional board Act. The gazette of the United Republic of Tanzania No. 23. Vol. 99 dated 8th June, 2018. Dodoma: Government Printer.
[8]
Heidari, M. H., Heshi, K. N., Mottagi, Z., Amini, M., & Shiri, A. S. (2015). Teachers professional ethics from Avicennas perspective. Educational Research and Reviews, 10 (17), 2460-2468.
[9]
Patrinos, H. A., & Kagia, R. (2007). Maximizing the performance of education systems. The many faces of corruption, 63-87. World Bank.
[10]
Fussy, D. S. (2018). The Institutionalisation of teacher ethics in Tanzania’s secondary schools: A School Heads’ Perspective. Pakistan Journal of Education, 35 (2), 79-96.
[11]
Mgonja, M. G. (2017). Responding to workplace absenteeism in Tanzania: The case study of public and private schools in Ilala Municipality and Mkuranga District. International Journal of Educational Leadership and Management, 5 (1), 85-108.
[12]
Mabagala, S. (2017). Prevalence of professional misconduct in Nzega District, Tanzania public secondary schools. African Journal of Teacher Education, 5 (1), 1-15.
[13]
Cobbold, C. (2015). Professionals without a profession? The paradox of contradiction about teaching as a profession in Ghana. Journal of Education and Practice, 6 (6), 125-134.
[14]
Mosha, M. (2016). Secondary school students’ attitudes towards teaching profession: A case study of Tanzania. Research Journal of Educational Studies and Review, 2 (5), 71-77.
[15]
Beauchamp, T. L., & Childress, J. F. (2001). Principles of biomedical ethics. Oxford University Press, USA.
[16]
Al-Bar, M. A., & Chamsi-Pasha, H. (2015). Beneficence. In Contemporary Bioethics (pp. 129-139). Springer, Cham.
[17]
Jahn, W. T. (2011). The 4 basic ethical principles that apply to forensic activities are respect for autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence, and justice. Journal of Chiropractic Medicine, 10 (3), 225.
[18]
Mohr, M., & Kettler, D. (1997). Ethical aspects of resuscitation. British journal of anaesthesia, 79 (2), 253-259.
[19]
Creswell, J. W. (2007). Qualitative inquiry & research design: Choosing among five approaches (2nd Ed.). Thousand Oaks, California: Sage Publications.
[20]
Mohajan, H. K. (2018). Qualitative research methodology in social sciences and related subjects. Journal of Economic Development, Environment and People, 7 (1), 23-48.
[21]
Cohen, L., Marion, L & Morrison, K. (2000), Research methods in education (5th Ed). London. Oxford university press.
[22]
Jovchelovitch, S., & Bauer, M. W. (2000). Narrative interviewing. Qualitative researching with text, image and sound, 57-74.
[23]
Schank, R. C. (1990). Tell me a story: A new look at real and artificial memory. Charles Scribner’s Sons.
[24]
Miles, M. B., & Huberman, A. M. (1994). Qualitative data analysis (2nd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.
[25]
McAlpine, L. (2016). Why might you use narrative methodology? A story about narrative. Eesti Haridusteaduste Ajakiri. Estonian Journal of Education, 4 (1), 32-57.
[26]
United Republic of Tanzania. (2018). Basic education statistics in Tanzania: Dar es Salaam: The Government Printer.
[27]
United Republic of Tanzania. (2016). National plan of action to end violence against women and children in Tanzania 2017/18 – 2021/22.
[28]
United Republic of Tanzania. (2009). The Law of the child act. Passed in the National Assembly on the 4th November, 2009. Retrieved from http://www.mcdgc.go.tz/data/Law_of_the_Child_Act_2009.pdf.
[29]
Stein, M., & Bockwoldt, L. (2016). Amount and implications of bullying, sexual harassment and corporal punishment in secondary boarding schools in Tanzania. International Journal of Education and Research, 4 (1), 283-300.
[30]
Legal Human and Rights Centre. (2017). Bi-Annual Tanzania Human Rights Report. Retrieved from https://www.academia.edu/34098622.
[31]
Kakkori, L. & Huttunen, R. (2007). Aristotle and Pedagogical Ethics. Paideusis: Journal of the Canadian Philosophy of Educations Society, 16 (1), 17-28.
[32]
Sternberg, R. (2003). Dress codes in the workplace. School Administrator, 6 (2), 38.
[33]
Anangisye, W., & Barrett, A. (2005, September). Professional status and responsibility: Tanzanian teachers views on misconduct. In 8th UKFIET International Conference on Education and Development: Learning and livelihood, University of Oxford (pp. 13-15).
[34]
Kagoda, A. M., & Sentongo, J. (2015). Practicing teachers’ perceptions of teacher trainees: Implications for teacher education. Universal Journal of Educational Research, 3 (2), 148-153.
[35]
Anangisye, W. A. (2010). Promoting teacher ethics in colleges of teacher education in Tanzania: Practices and challenge. African Journal of Teacher Education, 1 (1), 64-77.
[36]
Bold, T., Filmer, D., Martin, G., Molina, E., Rockmore, C., Stacy, B. & Wane, W. (2017). What do teachers know and do? does it matter? evidence from primary schools in Africa. The World Bank.
[37]
Donkor, A. K. (2017). Dominant causes of teacher absenteeism in basic schools of East Gonja District. Education Research Journal, 7 (9), 214–226.
[38]
Kitta, S., & Tilya, F. (2010). The status of learner-centred learning and assessment in Tanzania in the context of the competence-based curriculum. Papers in Education and Development, (29), 77-91.
[39]
Lukindo, J. J. (2016). Exploring Competence Based Education (CBE) in Rural Secondary Schools in Tanzania: English Language Teachers’ Conceptions and Experiences. Journal of Education and Practice, 7 (29), 62-67.
[40]
Komba, S. C., & Mwandanji, M. (2015). Reflections on the implementation of competence based curriculum in Tanzanian secondary schools. Journal of Education and Learning, 4 (2), 73-80.
[41]
Makunja, G. (2015). Adopting competence-based curriculum to improve quality of secondary education in Tanzania: “is it a dream or reality”? International Journal of Education and Research, 3 (11), 175-188.
[42]
Paulo, A. (2014). Pre-service teacher’s preparedness to implement Competence-Based Curriculum in secondary schools in Tanzania. International Journal of Education and Research, 2 (7), 219-230.
Browse journals by subject